Workshops

Summer 2020

As we become more reliant on virtual learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we began to offer online workshops for the first time. Our first batch of workshops were introductory Python workshops held over Zoom. The workshops lasted from 8/4 to 8/14, though you can access the meeting minutes at anytime below.

Intro to Python - Tuesday (8/4) and Thursday (8/6) from 2-3 EST

MEETING MINUTES

A one-hour crash course in Python basics, no prior experience expected. In this workshop, you will learn basic input and output, data types and variables, operations, and control structures. By the end of this session, you will have created a simple “Menu” program to simulate a scenario of your choice, from an interactive game to a real-life system.

Intro to Object-Oriented Programming - Monday (8/10) from 2-3 EST

MEETING MINUTES

A one-hour crash course on how to write efficient and flexible code using Object-Oriented Programming. In this workshop, you will learn how to create a class with instance variables and methods and how to extend this class to create child classes of the same nature. By the end of this session, you will have modeled a real-life object of your choice using Python classes.

Generative Art with Turtle - Wednesday (8/12) from 2-3 EST

MEETING MINUTES

What do you get when you combine visual art with code? Learn to create computer-generated art with Python’s graphics library, Turtle. This workshop will go over Turtle basics such as drawing lines and shapes with varying pen properties. We will also introduce the Math and Random modules. By the end of this session, you will have created your own mini-gallery of computer-generated drawings.

ML With Teachable Machine - Friday (8/14) from 2-3 EST

MEETING MINUTES

Create a machine learning model without a single line of code! This workshop will introduce you to basic ML concepts and vocabulary, such as neural networks, classification, regression, and training. Using Google’s Teachable Machine, you will build and train your own classification model and export it to TensorFlow. By the end of this session, you will have created a program that can sort an image into one of two categories.